Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle SUV
2023 Review

Find out all you need to know about the 2023 Mitsubishi Outlander hybrid SUV right here with Savvy

Last updated on February 29th, 2024
  Written by 
Savvy Editorial Team
Savvy's content writing team are professionals with a wide and diverse range of industry experience and topic knowledge. We write across a broad spectrum of finance-related topics to provide our readers with informative resources to help them learn more about a certain area or enable them to decide on which product is best for their needs with careful comparison. Meet the team behind the operation here. Visit our authors page to meet Savvy's expert writing team, committed to delivering informative and engaging content to help you make informed financial decisions.
Our authors



Fact checked

At Savvy, we are committed to providing accurate information. Our content undergoes a rigorous process of fact-checking before it is published. Learn more about our editorial policy.

What we like

What we don't like

Our verdict

There’s a lot to like about this second iteration of the Outlander – it drives well for the most part, feels like a real EV, is quicker, and quieter, and rates well against its rivals. But the price tag may leave some buyers considering alternatives.

At Savvy, our mission is to empower you to make informed financial choices. While we maintain stringent editorial standards, this article may include mentions of products offered by our partners. Here's how we generate income.

Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle SUV 2023: Summary

Offering huge amounts of space and a range that matches, the Aspire has heaps of grunt for an EV – even if you can’t hear it some of the time. Though it is pricey and has some strange omissions, it’s still a great SUV; if you can forgive its bumpy rides.

Price: how much does the Mitsubishi Outlander cost in Australia?

The Mitsubishi Outlander base model ES is a five-seat variant and costs $54,490 before on road costs. The mid-spec Aspire (as reviewed here) creeps up to $60,990 and the Exceed and Exceed Tourer trims are $65,990 and $68,490 respectively, before on road costs.

Minor services cost about $299 with major services ranging between $599 and $799.

Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle SUV 2023 - Prices in Australia
VariantSeatsDrive TypeDrive-Away Price (*NSW Example)
ES5 SeatsAll-Wheel Drive (AWD)$60,390
Aspire5 SeatsAll-Wheel Drive (AWD)$67,210
Exceed7 SeatsAll-Wheel Drive (AWD)$72,990
Exceed Tourer7 SeatsAll-Wheel Drive (AWD)$75,610 ($100,915 with addition of all possible extras)

Overview

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is a family-sized SUV which has been on the Australian market for about a decade in its petrol/Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) version. To date, they’ve sold over 300,000 units. The 2023 version has many improvements over the previous PHEV model, which we’ll discuss in the review.

Dimensions

4710L/1862W/1745H,    2706mm wheelbase

Available door options

5 Door, 7 seat SUV – two extra seats in Exceed and Exceed Tourer

Engines

Plug-In Hybrid: 2.5L four cylinder petrol engine and electric motor with single-speed transmission with an output of 185kW/450Nm

 Trims

Mid-spec Aspire, flagship Exceed and Exceed Tourer models that include two extra seats

Available colours

Warranty

10-year factory backed warranty, honoured if serviced at authorised dealers; battery pack warranty of 8-years or 160,000km

Similar to:

Toyota RAV4, Ford Escape PHEV

20230223_192819 - Copy
20230223_192853
20230220_094028 - Copy
20230220_094040
20230220_094050
20230220_094108 - Copy
20230220_094130
20230220_094321
20230220_094510
20230220_094722
20230220_094800
20230220_094805
20230223_192819 - Copy
20230223_192853
20230220_094028 - Copy
20230220_094040
20230220_094050
20230220_094108 - Copy
20230220_094130
20230220_094321
20230220_094510
20230220_094722
20230220_094800
20230220_094805

Performance and drive

Unlike Toyota or other hybrids, pushing your Outlander to the redline doesn’t fire up the ICE – the EV can handle pretty much anything you throw at it. This owes much to how the hybrid function is calibrated. Most hybrids will default to petrol once the battery is spent; this engine will favour the EV at every given opportunity which means when you press down on the accelerator, you get instant, smooth thrust. In that regard, it feels like a pure-bred EV, not a hybrid.

The powertrain has a suite of modes that distribute power throughout the all-wheel drive. These are Power, Eco, Tarmac, Gravel, Snow, and Mud.

Another batch of settings also change how the battery operates. The default is Normal, which leaves the battery and ICE engine optimised by on-board computer. EV mode makes all power electric, while Save mode emphasises the petrol engine to save the battery. The fourth mode is Charge mode, which uses the ICE engine to top up the battery. This takes about an hour to get it up from zero to 80%, according to the manufacturer.

You can also take advantage of six-stage regenerative braking using shift-paddles behind the steering wheel; you can add or take away regeneration in stages or engage the heaviest mode using a button on the centre console – it’s almost strong enough to employ one pedal driving in most situations, though you’ll need to tap the brake to come to a complete stop.

As for the drive, it’s comfortable and smooth for the most part thanks to its Super All-Wheel Control, but the usual Outlander drawback remains; driving over unexpected, jagged bumps and potholes can cause driver and passengers to really feel it underneath.

There’s also been a slight tune to the steering, causing a bit of understeer on either side of forward momentum. Out in the suburbs, you might not notice but out in the country or highways it will stand out.

Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle SUV 2023 - EV System
Battery TypeLi-ion
Battery Capacity (kWh)20 KWh
Battery Voltage (V)350
Variable mode regenerative braking system (RBS)Included
Innovative Pedal Operation modeIncluded
Charging time - Mode 4 DC Rapid Charger (min)38
Charging time - Mode 3 AC 15A Fast Charger (hrs)6.5
Charging time - Mode 2 AC 240V, 10A (hrs)9.5
Charging cable - Mode 3 AC 15AIncluded
Charging cable - Mode 2 AC 240V, 8A-10AIncluded
High voltage cut-off system Included

Battery size / capacity / fuel consumption / range

The battery pack is 50% bigger than the previous model, weighing in at 20kWh, giving the Aspire a range of 84km – 30km more than the older model. It also consumes 1.5L/100km of fuel, on a 185kW/450Nm engine. Electricity consumption was 26kWh/100hm. On a regular 240V socket, the PHEV takes about 9.5 hours to get to full charge. A DC fast charger will go from zero to 80 in about 38 minutes.

Speed:

    0 – 100Km: 8.2 sec.

Safety

The Outlander range of PHEVs have a five-star ANCAP safety rating, which includes a driver fatigue monitor, adaptive cruise control, eight airbags, AEB pedestrian and cyclist detection, emergency lane assist and lane departure warning, blind spot warning, traffic sign recognition, and front and rear parking sensors.

Interior

This generation of Outlander's cabin quality and appearance are hallmarks, and the PHEV is no different. The interior has a contemporary style, prioritises comfort, and is rationally organised and simple to operate.

It's rather lush, too. The cabin atmosphere in Aspire model grades and higher is a definite step up from the previous generation of more frugal and economical Outlanders. The front seats have a decent room to them, but the third row might be a tough ask for taller blokes, even if you want to sacrifice the already small boot space by sliding it forward – which is 100L less than the Toyota RAV4, for example.

Aesthetics hasn't come at the expense of ergonomics. The HVAC settings are thankfully not hidden in the centre screen, which can be challenging to access while driving, as the centre console still has the old-fashioned buttons and knobs.

There is a USB-A and USB-C plug in front of the gearshift, and the infotainment system is very easy to use. Unfortunately, the on-when-it-feels-like-it wireless charging hasn’t been ironed out, which is a bit of a disappointment.

Aspire model grades and above score two on-board power sockets that can power anything from laptops to your blender if you wanted. You also get a 12.3” digital instrument cluster, a 9” central touchscreen, wireless Apple CarPlay and wired-only Android Auto.

The Aspire model includes 20-inch alloys, a leather-trimmed steering wheel, heated front seats, head-up display, powered tailgate, wireless phone charging and twin USB charging points for second-row passengers.

Outlander PHEV Exterior

The Outlander looks, well, a little outlandish. The front grille is jutted in from both sides by a cornered panel, with thin wedged LEDs to either side and headlamps shunted away into the outermost extremes. Fog lights span underneath. It has a brutish, robust appearance which could appeal to suburban and weekend warriors. It comes in white, white diamond, red diamond, cosmic blue, sterling silver, titanium grey, and black diamond colours. Mitsubishi says the Outlander can also act as a backup battery cell for your home to offset your electricity bills. Neat.

Wheel size:

20-inch wheels, 350mm front disc brakes, 330mm back disc brakes

Outlander PHEV Exterior 

The Outlander looks, well, a little outlandish. The front grille is jutted in from both sides by a cornered panel, with thin wedged LEDs to either side and headlamps shunted away into the outermost extremes. Fog lights span underneath. It has a brutish, robust appearance which could appeal to suburban and weekend warriors. It comes in white, white diamond, red diamond, cosmic blue, sterling silver, titanium grey, and black diamond colours. Mitsubishi says the Outlander can also act as a backup battery cell for your home to offset your electricity bills. Neat.

Wheel size:

20-inch wheels, 350mm front disc brakes, 330mm back disc brakes

Boot / storage space

As mentioned, the boot space is smaller than most models – and weirdly enough, due to the rear axle mounted electric motor, there is no spare tyre. You do get a puncture repair kit – and if you faff that you’re a bit in the lurch. Better have your roadside assist on speed dial, then.

Volume in litres:

478L

Towing capacity:

1,600kg braked

Conclusion

There’s a lot to like about this second iteration of the Outlander – it drives well for the most part, feels like a real EV, is quicker, and quieter, and rates well against its rivals. But the price tag may leave some buyers considering alternatives. Will you save money on fuel (and potentially energy bills) in the long-term – of course. But it’s up to you if the upfront costs are worth the distant savings in the future. If you aren’t quite prepared to go all-in on EVs, the Outlander Aspire is a great mid-ground family vehicle that will stand the test of time.

Getting finance for your new EV

If you are considering buying an Outlander PHEV, or even another EV, you can talk to our team to discuss which car finance options will work best for your situation.

This guide provides general information and does not consider your individual needs, finances or objectives. We do not make any recommendation or suggestion about which product is best for you based on your specific situation and we do not compare all companies in the market, or all products offered by all companies. It’s always important to consider whether professional financial, legal or taxation advice is appropriate for you before choosing or purchasing a financial product.

Approval for car loans is always subject to our lender’s terms, conditions and qualification criteria. Lenders will undertake a credit check in line with responsible lending obligations to help determine whether you’re in a position to take on the loan you’re applying for.

The interest rate, comparison rate, fees and monthly repayments will depend on factors specific to your profile, such as your financial situation, as well others, such as the loan’s size and your chosen repayment term. Costs such as broker fees, redraw fees or early repayment fees, and cost savings such as fee waivers, aren’t included in the comparison rate but may influence the cost of the loan. Different terms, fees or other loan amounts may result in a different comparison rate.

The content on our website is produced by experts in the field of finance and reviewed as part of our editorial guidelines. We endeavour to keep all information across our site updated with accurate information.

In this article

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pinterest

Looking for a car loan quote?

Compare lenders with Savvy and save on your next car loan.

* Terms and conditions and lending criteria applies.

Smart money saving tips

Subscribe to our newsletter.

By subscribing you agree to our privacy policy

Related articles

Easily compare car loan quotes today

Our car loans take your money further. See how you can compare and save with us.

Did you find this page helpful?

Yes
No
Thanks for your feedback!