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Cars with the Best Resale Value in Australia in 2024

Find out the cars that retain their value the best in Australia right here with Savvy today!
Published on November 23rd, 2020
  Written by 
Thomas Perrotta
Thomas Perrotta is the managing editor of Savvy. Throughout his time at the company, Thomas has specialised in personal finance, namely car, personal and small loans, although he has also written on topics ranging from mortgages to business loans to banking and more. Thomas graduated from the University of Adelaide with a Bachelor of Media, majoring in journalism, and has previously had his work published in The Advertiser.
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Bill Tsouvalas

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Bill Tsouvalas
Bill Tsouvalas is the managing director and a key company spokesperson at Savvy. As a personal finance expert, he often shares his insights on a range of topics, being featured on leading news outlets including News Corp publications such as the Daily Telegraph and Herald Sun, Fairfax Media publications such as the Australian Financial Review, the Seven Network and more. Bill has over 15 years of experience working in the finance industry and founded Savvy in 2010 with a vision to provide affordable and accessible finance options to all Australians. He has built Savvy from a small asset finance brokerage into a financial comparison website which now attracts close to 2 million Aussies per year and was included in the BRW’s Fast 100 in 2015 as one of the fastest-growing companies in the country. He’s passionate about helping Australians make financially savvy decisions and reviews content across the brand to ensure its accuracy. You can follow Bill on LinkedIn.
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If you’re buying a car with an eye to selling it down the track, it’s important to keep an eye on your model’s resale value. Different cars depreciate at different rates, so it’s worth analysing what yours might be worth a few years down the track.

The Australian Automotive Dealer Association (AADA) releases its Automotive Insights Report (AIR) each month, which breaks down key used car sales trends, including the retained value of vehicles. These figures are based on average sales data from both private sellers and dealerships and are split into age brackets of 2-4 years and 5-7 years.

You can find out the cars with the best resale value in Australia in Savvy’s breakdown of the AIR from February 2024 right here.

Passenger car retained value: 2-4 years old

February’s data revealed that Toyota’s 86 was the model that held the most value among all passenger vehicles in Australia between two and four years old, with its resale value representing an increase of almost 7% on its original sale price.

The fastback coupe sports car is joined by a pair of hatchbacks in the Honda Jazz (105.1%) and another Toyota model in the Yaris (104.6%) as the only vehicles with an average used sale price beyond their RRP.

For reference, AADA states in its AIR that the average retained value of passenger vehicles between two and four years old in February 2024 sat at 85.5%.

Elsewhere, the Kia Picanto (99.4%) and Ford Mustang (97.8%) rounded out the top five for retained value in this age bracket, while Toyota took up two further places in the top ten with the Corolla (96.0%) and Camry (94.7%).

Model Avg. retained value %
Toyota 86
106.9
Honda Jazz
105.1
Toyota Yaris
104.6
Kia Picanto
99.4
Ford Mustang
97.8
Honda Civic
96.0
Toyota Corolla
96.0
Mini Hatch
94.9
Suzuki Swift
94.8
Toyota Camry
94.7

SUV retained value: 2-4 years old

When it comes to the retained values of SUVs between two and four years old, the Suzuki Jimny stands head and shoulders above the rest with a resale value of 28.9% more than its original retail price.

The popular all-terrain 4×4 sits over 20% ahead of the next-best resale value car, the Toyota LandCruiser (107.4%), and more than 25% ahead of the third-placed Yaris Cross (103.3%).

These three were joined by the Land Rover Defender (100.7%), Toyota RAV4 (100.7%) and Nissan Patrol (100.1%) as SUVs that outsold their market price on average.

Appearances by the Fortuner (94.7%), C-HR (93.9%) and LandCruiser Prado (91.2%) meant that six of the top ten for retained value in this segment belonged to Toyota.

Model Avg. retained value %
Suzuki Jimny
128.9
Toyota LandCruiser
107.4
Toyota Yaris Cross
103.3
Land Rover Defender
100.7
Toyota RAV4
100.7
Nissan Patrol
100.1
Toyota Fortuner
94.7
Toyota C-HR
93.9
Jeep Wrangler
92.2
Toyota LandCruiser Prado
91.2

Passenger car retained value: 5-7 years old

The Mitsubishi Mirage was the clear standout for retained value among passenger vehicles between the ages of five and seven years old, with average used car sales placing it at 106.5% of its original cost.

This puts it well ahead of the average retained value for passenger vehicles in February recorded in the AIR, which sat at 71.5%.

The Toyota Yaris (94.8%), Honda Jazz (88.0%) and Kia Picanto (86.7%) held their places in the top five, sitting in second, fourth and fifth, respectively.

Moving into the top three was the Toyota Prius C (93.5%), which was one of three vehicles to retain a resale value above 90% among passenger cars in this age bracket, while the 86 dropped to seventh (85.4%) despite topping the charts among two to four-year-old models.

Model Avg. retained value %
Mitsubishi Mirage
106.5
Toyota Yaris
94.8
Toyota Prius C
93.5
Honda Jazz
88.0
Kia Picanto
86.7
Mazda2
85.9
Toyota 86
85.4
Ford Mustang
84.5
Honda Civic
81.4
Suzuki Swift
80.5

SUV retained value: 5-7 years old

The LandCruiser remains in strong demand among used car buyers, retaining comfortably the most value of all SUVs between five and seven years old at 91.5%.

This is well above the February average for the age bracket of 64.4%, the lowest among all recorded segments across the month.

The MG ZS (86.3%) and Suzuki Ignis (86.0%) both appeared in the top three for retained value despite not making the top ten among two to four-year-old models, while the Jeep Wrangler (84.1%) and Nissan Patrol (82.1%) remained around the mark.

Additionally, despite making up six of the top ten best resale value cars in the younger age bracket, only three Toyota models appear here, with the Fortuner (79.7%) and LandCruiser Prado (75.8%) making the list.

There’s also no sign of the immensely popular Jimny, which was only released in 2019 in its current people-pleasing iteration.

Model Avg. retained value %
Toyota LandCruiser
91.5
MG ZS
86.3
Suzuki Ignis
86.0
Jeep Wrangler
84.1
Nissan Patrol
82.1
Hyundai Kona
79.9
Toyota Fortuner
79.7
Mazda CX-3
77.5
Suzuki Grand Vitara
77.4
Toyota LandCruiser Prado
75.8

How can I maximise the resale value of my car?

There are several tips you may wish to consider before selling your car to help maximise the amount you get in return for it. These can include:

  • Maintain a consistent service history: regularly following the manufacturer's recommended service schedule is crucial. This demonstrates to potential buyers that the car has been well-maintained and cared for. Also, keep a record of all service appointments, parts replaced, and any repairs done to add transparency for the buyer.
  • Address wear and tear: consider addressing minor scratches, dents or worn upholstery and ensure all features and components are functioning correctly. Addressing any minor mechanical issues promptly can help avoid potential red flags for buyers.
  • Keep it clean: maintaining a clean interior and exterior showcases the car's overall condition and creates a positive first impression for interested parties. Avoid smoking in the vehicle, as this will be a major put-off for most buyers.
  • Stick to factory parts (if applicable): while replacements might be necessary, prioritise using genuine manufacturer parts whenever possible, especially for major repairs. This can assure buyers that the car retains its original quality and functionality. Avoid DIY jobs, as these can do more harm than good.
  • Consider mileage: generally, cars with lower mileage tend to hold their value better. If possible, avoid unnecessary short trips and strive for fuel-efficient driving habits.
  • Think about replacing your tyres: if your car is well-loved and hasn’t had its tyres replaced in a while, buying new ones just before selling can increase the amount you may be able to receive for it.

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